WORM COUNTS FOR HORSES

Announcement

Due to a house move, I won't be available via the internet for a few months. Please keep an eye on the website for updates

For any current clients who have paid for advance packs, I will still process your samples and will still be available for help and advice.

Thank you

Pasture Management – help protect your horse

Effective Worm Control – the four “P’s”

It’s simple!   Poo pick your pasture daily!  If you remove the dung from pasture, you greatly lessen the chances of your horse being re-infested with worms!

It is not possible to put a figure or percentage on how much of a difference poo picking makes but if you think about it doesn’t it make sense?  Worm eggs are in the dung, they hatch and crawl onto grass stalks, if you pick the dung up you are preventing them from hatching on the pasture, being eaten by your horse and growing to adult worms inside your horse.

It is labour intensive and we all have a tight schedule with all the responsibilities that come with owning a horse but it is the one thing you can do that does not cost you any money, will save you money, helps the condition of your pasture and is vastly healthier for your horse.

The life cycle of most worms means that to be safe you should poo pick daily but every other day is OK, every three days is maybe stretching it a bit, especially if the environmental conditions are wet and warm.

So rather than digging in your pockets for cash, get your arms (and legs) fit, by picking your horse’s poo’s up instead!

Remember the 4 “P’s” – “Poo Picking Prevents Parasites!”

 

Other Pasture Management and Control Measures

Quarantine, worm count and de-worm new horses before they are added to a group or herd or allowed on your already, worm controlled, pastures.

Rest pasture and/or graze other herbivores with or alternately with horses.  Sheep are particularly helpful to pasture where horses have made the grazing poor.

Chain harrowing may be helpful but only when the pasture is very dry, in the hottest weather conditions.

Evaluate your worming control measures by having Faecal Worm Egg Counts completed and only use drugs when necessary!